Category «nutrition»

Bitter Melon

Bitter melon, also known as balsam pear, bitter gourd and foo qua, belongs to the squash family. Resembling a warty cucumber, it has edible yellow-green skin (yellow-orange when ripe) and crunchy, watery flesh filled with fibrous seeds and core. Underripe melons are typically used in Asian and Indian cooking. Due to their high quinine content, …

Artichoke

The artichoke, the flower bud of an edible thistle, ranges in size from “baby” to the size of a grapefruit. The artichoke’s overlapping layers of leaves are medium to deep green, sometimes streaked with purple. Varieties such as green globe (the most common) have a sharp “thorn” at the tip of each leaf. The leaves …

feijoa

The feijoa (fay-joh-ah or fay-yoh-ah) is sometimes called pineapple guava but is not a true guava. This small, bumpy, egg-shaped fruit from South America has a bitter green skin and an exotic aroma. The cream-colored flesh has a granular texture, and its tart flavor has hints of quince, pineapple, and mint. When ripe, the center …

Cranberries

Cranberries were named “cranberries” by the Pilgrims, who thought the vines looked like the head of a crane (the “e” was eventually lost). Today, more than 110,000 metric tons of cranberries are produced in the U.S. each year. Grown in bogs, these firm, scarlet berries are distinctively tart. Peak season: October–November; available September–December Buy and …

Scotch Bonnet Pepper

The fiery Scotch bonnet, closely related to the habanero, looks like a tiny, slightly flattened, pale green, yellow or orange bell pepper with deep furrows. About 1½ to 2 inches long, it has a smoky, fruity flavor, and is intensely hot (150,000 to 325,000 Scoville units). Common in Caribbean cooking and essential to Jamaican jerk …